First Treatment

September 21, 2017
First treatment of chemo began yesterday, a very long day. We were up at 2:00am, both unable to sleep. Loaded our little Prius car and talked about the day before.

The day before Bobbi had her port put in at the War Memorial Hospital in town. The procedure went well, no complications. Her mother and sister-in-law Debbie waited patiently with me. It was good. Her mother, Betty, has naturally been very concerned watching her daughter battle through each step. Debbie and her have kept in to touch as well. Messaging with family kept everyone updated. She has a strong team cheering her on which has helped tremendously. She decided to let friends know back in Wisconsin too. Took a bit because she didn’t want to concern people and such. When we left Wisconsin last year it was sudden and during a rough period. She had a calling to return home closer to her siblings and I was exhausted from so many hospital trips myself. Working all day in one and then having me in and out of it took its toll. It was a difficult decision because of the close relationships in town. The move put distance between her family there and here but I think she knew deep down that she had to return home. Everything happened so fast. It really helped her connecting again with her friends. I contacted a lot of her friends, letting them know about this blog, but I’m sure I missed some. If so PLEASE understand and don’t take it personal. Simply write her a note in messages. She deleted her first account when we left because there were simply too many people neither of us knew listed.

Bobbi’s port, was stitched into the left side of her chest, is where blood can be drawn and the chemo will be slowly dripped into. It was an out patient procedure. Arrived around 9:30, left about 4:00. She got along with all the nurses and doctors. It seems like once they know she spent so many years of her life in nursing that it instantly creates a bond with the same people. She doesn’t bring it up until they ask her if she understands certain things and she then shares with them why she does. There was one nurse that really upset her though. When she was checking Bobbi in she mentioned that she had worked with cancer patients in the past, and told her that her hair would soon be history, that she’d probably wake up some morning and clumps of it would be in her bed. She then added that her teeth would probably fall out eventually too. WTF? That really was a bizarre exchange that left her fighting tears. I was blown away and didn’t know what to say. All her doctors have told her that her hair might thin a little but the chemo used today, for her type of cancer, wasn’t the type used years ago. The nurse had no business telling her this. Shot her chances at a Daisy Award right in the ass.

When we got home her mom and Fred stopped by with supper, which was very nice.

We arrived in Petoskey about 7:30. Our first appointment meeting with her Doc was at 8:30 so we stopped a park a mile away from the hospital. Had a snack and walked around watching the fishermen who were out early along the shore of Lake Michigan.

When she met with her doctor (who is super nice and kind) she shared about the concerns of her hair falling out in clumps and teeth dropping out. He was shocked! He first asked jokingly about the teeth, were they bad? They didn’t appear to be. The hair he said might thin, but it shouldn’t be bad. Bobbi is ok with this. She knows the biggest battle has little to do with hair but really didn’t want to go bald and toothless.

An hour later we had a “teaching” class on the infusion treatment of chemo. A short video, a 30 minute talk with a very nice nurse, and then went to the area where treatments would began. Her medicine would be mixed up, according to her blood work the day before and takes about 90 minutes. We were taken into a nice private room, nice reclining chairs and another nice nurse talked with her the process. When the medicine arrived it would be checked by two nurses to make sure there were no mistakes. First nausea medicine was given through her IV then the first bag would take about 45 minutes with half hour flush, a wait of about a half hour and then the second medicine administered. The room was chilly so they gave her a nice blanket. When the treatment began I moved my chair next to her and started to read a book to her.”The Girl on the Train”. She got tired at different times. Her sisters messaged her and it helped keep her spirits up.

We were done about 2:30, returned to our car and took off for Upper Michigan. She was extremely tired but wanted ice cream. Which was a little strange because she never really cared for it much. Had to stop at a couple places to find it. We have dentist appointments on Drummond Island so drove to her mom’s cabin outside DeTour Village instead of Sault Ste. Marie, where home is. When we arrived she laid down on the couch and dozed off. I stayed up to watch for a fever and make sure things would go well. At about 10:00 all was good and called it a day. The first treatment was started, we now know the procedure, times, and hoping for a surgery in December.

People are concerned about my challenges with the ticker ticking. Have no worries. I don’t think about it and simply manage it with the tools learned and given. There is a lot on our plate and at times each of our challenges collide a little. No one promised life would be easy all the time. It is what it is, and you just keep putting one foot in front of the other. Bobbi is up this morning, moving about, washing clothes, humming, and full of energy. Blood sugar number high but her injected insulin and took care of that. All an all a busy couple days but the sun is shining bright this morning and a thunderstorm last night has made the air outside fresh and the ferry ride to the dentist should be refreshing.  (Click here to see our ride on the ferry)

Dentist went fine but driving back to the Soo it was a rough ride. Side-effects kicked in and made the rest of the day miserable. Is like a terrible flu. It comes on and goes, then returns with a vengeance. Twisty must have started to feel the fight and knows it’s days of running rampant are slowly coming in an end. Difficult watching the one you love go through such difficult times. Lasted throughout the evening. Kept eye on temp. Heat when chills hit, ice when the sweating struck, and mellow easy listening music on to help her fall asleep. Never in a million years did we expect this demon to knock on our door. She ended her career at work so that we’d have more time together, and caretaking working on hearts all day. To now us switching roles and my needing to be there for her, regardless of my cardiac challenge. It’s something that two people growing old together simply do. We take care of each other. We got this. The support of family and friends have been overwhelming. For this endless thanks and appreciation is given. We don’t think about her not making it through this challenging battle. She WILL. We try not to read what the internet says and odds and statistics say and listen to the doctors and professionals. Everyone is different and respond to medications and treatments different. I do believe people do follow their loved ones who lose their battles to broken heart syndrome and know this will be the case on this. We don’t dwell on the negative, have no room or energy for it. She is the kindest and strongest woman I’ve ever met, loved by many, and I truly believe we’ll have many years to come. The word cancer is scary, but a lot of research and studies have been made the last twenty years. It’s the ignorant people, like the nurse at the War Memorial Hospital who said she’d surely lose her hair AND teeth that need to rethink their knowledge and people skills. This is life though. It has its good, bad, and it’s ugly. Take advantage of the friends and family in your life and waste little time on the trivial things. Putting two socks in the washer with only one coming out in the dryer isn’t a reason to complain and moan. Our family may bend during turbulent times but we don’t break. All of us have loved ones hurting in some fashion. Take the time to call them, visit, and simply let them know they are important.

Above all else, guard your heart,
for everything you do flows from it.
Proverbs 4:23

11 thoughts on “First Treatment

  1. I do admire your strength for caring for Bobbi. I personally know what it is like to care for someone with cancer (mother) and I felt like I had no control in making her feel better. I was a huge support but I wanted to make it painless for her.
    Now I’m a cancer patient and I find my role a lot easier. My husband is doing a marvellous job. I’m sure Bobbi like me appreciates everything you do.

    I shall give a reward to the nurse.
    “The Most Tactless Award.

    Pls give my regards to Bobbi and Mike take care of yourself too. 😊

    Liked by 1 person

  2. So sorry you are going through this. Just know that we who are doing Chemo or all in this together. My wife and I will keep you in our prayers.🙏

    Like

  3. My thoughts & prayers extend to both of you, your loved ones and medical staff as you persevere to annihilate “twisty”. You both are inspirational warriors! My bet is on you to win this battle! ♡

    Liked by 1 person

  4. My thoughts & prayers extend to both of you, your loved ones and medical staff as you persevere to annihilate “twisty”. You both are inspirational warriors! My bet is on you to win this battle! ♡

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Thank you so much for this monumental update. And yes, first day chemo is monumental. I walked this path years ago with my husband so it is a familiar, though bittersweet, rememberance. To lighten any concerns, long and lush hair is overrated!! We were shocked and surprised when my husband’s hair grew back….it came back soft, curly and with ZERO grays in it….everything it wasn’t before chemo! 😂😂😂 Your warrior friends continue with prayers and resolve❣️

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I love you my warrior cousin. I am sending you a package of my positive thoughts and prayers. Remember this journey your on right now is only a group of moments in time before this cancer is behind you. I’m thinking of you everyday!

      Liked by 1 person

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